Western Nebraska Observer - Observations all along the line - Kimball & the Southern Panhandle First

Whooing uniquely in Kimball County

 

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These long eared owls, approximately 13 inches in size, were recently seen nesting north of Kimball. The person who reported the sightings has seen other types of owls in the last 20 years, but not this kind. One reason is that these owls are very nocturnal. According to the Owl Institute, the long-eared owl can be seen in much of the northern United States and parts of Canada. They do not build nests, but instead use other things as nests, such as reusing old nests or using caves, tree cavities, cliffs or the ground. Also according to the Owl Institute, the long eared owls prefer thick, brushy areas as a habitat, instead of the dense forests preferred by the great horned owl.

These long eared owls, approximately 13 inches in size, were recently seen nesting north of Kimball. The person who reported the sightings has seen other types of owls in the last 20 years, but not this kind. One reason is that these owls are very nocturnal. According to the Owl Institute, the long-eared owl can be seen in much of the northern United States and parts of Canada. They do not build nests, but instead use other things as nests, such as reusing old nests or using caves, tree cavities, cliffs or the ground. Also according to the Owl Institute, the long eared owls prefer thick, br...



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